Details of the record

TitleSEX CHROMOSOMES IN FLOWERING PLANTS
AuthorsRAY MING, JIANPING WANG, PAUL H. MOORE,
AND ANDREW H. PATERSON
Year2007
Taxoncross
PDFMing_et_al_AJB.pdf
PublicationAm J Botany 94(2): 141-150
Journal_link
Publisher_note
Supplemental
AbstractSex chromosomes in dioecious and polygamous plants evolved as a mechanism for ensuring outcrossing to increase genetic
variation in the offspring. Sex specificity has evolved in 75% of plant families by male sterile or female sterile mutations, but
well-defined heteromorphic sex chromosomes are known in only four plant families. A pivotal event in sex chromosome
evolution, suppression of recombination at the sex determination locus and its neighboring regions, might be lacking in most
dioecious species. However, once recombination is suppressed around the sex determination region, an incipient Y chromosome
starts to differentiate by accumulating deleterious mutations, transposable element insertions, chromosomal rearrangements, and
selection for male-specific alleles. Some plant species have recently evolved homomorphic sex chromosomes near the inception
of this evolutionary process, while a few other species have sufficiently diverged heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Comparative
analysis of carefully selected plant species together with some fish species promises new insights into the origins of sex
chromosomes and the selective forces driving their evolution.

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